Alaska Team Practices, Tune-up Games & Other Updates

Discussion in 'Alaska Aces' started by hoops, Jun 2, 2014.


  1. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    In sports or business, its about playing the right way, say Alaska’s Wilfred Uytengsu

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    “I think if you go to all walks of life, all socioeconomic categories, when you mentioned Alaska, people would say either PBA or milk. Those are the two things that com to mind,” Wilfred Uytengsu, chief executive officer of Alaska Milk, said in an exclusive interview.

    The 53-year-old businessman sat down with BusinessWorld and shared his vision in running his company, his basketball team and how he loves sports and maintain an active, healthy lifestyle.

    AN ICONIC BRAND
    So how did Alaska, the brand, became a household name in milk.

    “I think people today look at Alaska as an iconic brand mostly associated with milk. But can you say that we’re no. 1 in the marketplace because of the PBA team? I would say it’s complementary. It helped us but it’s by no means, it’s the only reason being in a leadership position also entails doing very well in your distribution, having an excellent product, making sure that we communicate to our consumers in different ways thru tri-media,” added Uytengsu.

    Alaska has been a symbol of winning and it was proven through the years.

    Since joining the PBA in 1986, the company has carried only one brand, which has been associated to the success of Alaska be it on the court or the market.

    “Over the years, it helped our brand awareness. We’re the only team, I think in the PBA, that has maintained one brand over the years except for one year, Hills Brothers in 1987, and the reason we’re forced to shift over is because we have a long labor strike. It didn’t make sense to advertise a brand that wasn’t on the shells. With the exception of that one year, all of the years we played in the PBA and all of our titles, have been under one brand. I think the consumer and the fan identifies with that. Because of that consistency, we have certainly elevated the brand awareness of Alaska over these years,” said Uytengsu.

    Of course, the brand slogan “Wala Pa Ring Tatalo Sa Alaska” does ring a bell to consumers. It has become the byword for people looking to buy a can or a box of milk.

    But that slogan also applies strategically not only to business but its basketball team.

    The slogan, according to Uytengsu, had a strong recall both for the brand and the basketball team.

    “We would like to say, on the basketball court, “Wala Pa Ring Tatalo sa Alaska”, because it certainly happened during the 1990s run,” said Uytengsu.

    Uytengsu’s Alaska team built a dynasty in the 90s, capturing nine of their 14 total championship collections, capped by a grand slam in 1996.

    “Of course, when you win a game, you would hear fans chanting that slogan from time to time. Even our opponents would sometime even mock us if they beat us. That’s why, the mere fact that they repeated the slogan from time to time, to me it’s both a compliment and a testament that it has a strong recall,” added Uytengsu.

    BASKETBALL AS A STRONG FOUNDATION
    Alaska has established itself in the market as the leading milk brand, particularly in the retail business.

    But basketball played an important role in putting the brand to where it is now.

    Looking back in the early 1970s, basketball has become visibly attached with Alaska.

    That commercial where we saw import Cisco Oliver playing one-on-one against Michael Uytengsu, Wilfred’s younger brother, had a strong impact for kids at that time.

    The phrase “Galing Mo, Man!” were mentioned by people playing street basketball and the recall was astounding.

    “We made a remake of that commercial (Galing Mo, Man!) a couple of times already. Because the commercial was so old, we almost have to remind the next generation about that commercial. I just spoke at PANA several weeks ago, I was talking at the commercial and I was looking at the young audience and said ‘you know I have to ask the older people to explain about the Alaska one-on-one commercial Galing Mo, Man!’, because I think it’s definitely before their time.”

    “It has certainly become indelible in many consumers’ mind. It was my younger brother, six years younger, who helped popularized Alaska. I guess I prefer to be on the other side of the camera,” added Uytengsu.

    Of course, basketball team itself has become a great marketing tool for the brand over the years.

    “They do special features with the players. Perhaps, they do TV commercials. They do print ads. As a company, the other things we do is we go out in the provincial game. We talked to our sales force and we would organize a mall tour, we do a customer dinner, we’ll do photo opportunities and this is some way we can differentiate ourselves to our competitors because even our customers want to go and meet our players, they want to talk to them, have dinner with them. They wanted to have that Kodak moment. So these are the special things we do. We’ll have them go to a store, we’ll have them grace an opening. All of these are different ways of activating the sport’s game. The sport’s game has a marketing vehicle for Alaska,” added Uytengsu.

    Since putting up a PBA team in 1986, Alaska has established awareness from almost all walks of life.

    “It happens when I have foreign visitors or anywhere else. If I were in a restaurant, the waiter would want to talk to me about the basketball team. So I think it has been very powerful in having one (brand). I think it also helps in consumers. Everyone loves a winner. Consumers would identify to that,” he said.

    “So the PBA team is part and parcel of that. It’s a nontraditional way that means getting to the hearts and minds of the consumer and I think we’ve done that successfully.”

    CLEAN AND WHOLESOME IDENTITY
    Since basketball has become the country’s no. 1 sport, Alaska studied the viability of putting up a PBA team.

    After spending years studying in the United States, the young Uytengsu came home and was immediately given an important assignment by his late dad, Wilfred Sr.

    What’s the impact of having a PBA team in terms of building identity to their brand?

    “If we go back to 1985-86, we were still trying to establish brand identity and brand awareness. It was actually my late father who suggested we study whether or not it would be viable for us to put up a PBA team to augment our advertising of Alaska in a nontraditional way. So it was the first project he assigned to me. I just came back after spending 10 years abroad and we studied the viability of putting up a PBA team,” said Uytengsu.

    “We determined that at that time almost 30 years ago that the cost was about 25 cents on a dollar. We tried to compute what the airtime, print, radio time that we would receive for being talked about every time they would mention Alaska or Alaska player. The value was about 25 cents on a dollar. So from a quantifiable standpoint, that seemed quite favorable from the quality of aspect, we have determined what image we are going to actually project. Because if you produce a TV commercial or radio commercial, the brand managers or advertising agencies would write a commercial to project a certain message,” he added.

    Since Alaska is mostly associated to kids and their mothers, Uytengsu felt it’s only fitting their PBA team should uphold a clean, wholesome image, someone young players would look up to.

    Certainly, there were challenges along the way as Alaska had to strike a balance between putting up a wholesome image and establishing a competitive PBA team that would continuously promote them in a positive way.

    “We said from the very beginning, if we’re going to have a team, we want to project a clean and wholesome image. For selling milk, mothers are our target market together with their children and that’s the image we want to project. Secondly, that we want to have a team that will be good ambassadors of brand Alaska. So we, from the very beginning, look at them as strategic business unit and make sure our players and our coaches would be ambassadors of the brand both on and off the court,” added Uytengsu.

    WINNING WITH INTEGRITY
    How the players present themselves on and off the court reflect on the organization and Uytengsu uphold this important value.

    “Over the years, we’ve used the basketball team to be a springboard for other development sports program. We really started the PBA team because that’s the aspirational side of it. Every child or every fan looks up to the PBA. Grade school, high school, collegiate, that’s the big ticket,” said Uytengsu.

    “So, now that it has given credibility, the success over these years, that allowed us to create basketball camps around the whole new ones aside from the professional teams,” he added.

    For Uytengsu, upholding the philosophy of “playing it the right away” applies both in his team and the business he runs.

    “We continue to do things the way the rules are laid out. As I said a long time ago, it’s about winning with integrity,” added Uytengsu.

    Known for being one of the most critical owners in the PBA, Uytengsu speaks his mind when it comes to salary cap issues, one-sided trades and in the past, Fil-Sham issues.

    He continues to be the lone voice in the wilderness, making a shout out about equal playing field and transparency.

    “Used to be P50 to P100 million was sufficient to run a PBA team, but you know today it’s a common knowledge that it’s probably P150 to P200 million to run a team. Part of that is there’s some inflation to salaries. Unfortunately, the reality is that salaries of players are larger than what they appear on contract,” said Uytengsu.

    Uytengsu cited the cases of Paul Lee, Joe Devance and Willie Miller, who have expressed their desire to play elsewhere despite being offered a maximum offer by their mother teams.

    “You have the most recent situation with Paul Lee, already been offered a maximum contract extension where he is but then asked to be traded. Joe Devance is another example and many more,” added Uytengsu.

    “You have to ask yourself, why is this happening? Why does the commissioner, not dug on it deeper? It’s unfortunate that at some point in time, the viability of the league will be in question, you can say. Look, three new teams just came into the PBA. But if you also look at the formation, you’re seeing two organizations now essentially controlling the league with multiple teams, which I don’t think is healthy for the league because the success of all top sports leagues around the world are one team, one owner, independent.”

    “Otherwise, you end up seeing an intramural between two corporate conglomerates. They have the advantage of sharing resources having multiple teams. You see trades going on between sister companies. Yes, they go through a third party or conduit but then what happens is this poor teams end up just being facilitators. You also see players being traded and ending up going back to the team he came from after a year. It’s almost like he has already served his purpose and was returned. I think it’s unfortunate. It made things more difficult to compete as individuals and as independent team to be successful in that regard,” he added.

    But Uytengsu is still willing to face this as a challenge.

    “I say it’s frustrating, but yeah, it challenged me more because I want to show that you can be successful doing things the right way. That’s part of our business philosophy. Our philosophy is that you can be very successful as an institution and set the example for the youth and for other companies that if we want to elevate business as a whole and be attractive and looked at by foreign direct investment, we want to create that platform, not just perception, but the reality that you can be successful in the Philippines above board,” explained Uytengsu.

    “We’re critical because we call it as we see it. If the rule is that the salary cap is X then it should be X not one peso more than that. That’s the rule. Same thing with the shot clock. If you don’t get a shot off in 24 seconds and you shot in 24.5, sorry. Time ran out. That’s the way it should be. I’m critical because I want to see an equal level playing field in the league. I think that’s where the league would truly prosper. The league has been successful. I think it could be more successful if we simply abide by all those rules,” he added.

    NOT THROWING THE TOWEL YET
    Since establishing a dynasty in the 1990s, winning championships has come just occasionally for Alaska.

    But Uytengsu isn’t complaining as long as they keep on winning with integrity.

    “As far as Alaska is concerned, I’m stubborn. We want to see things on the right way and we can still be successful. We don’t have the same level of success that we had back in the ’90s, but we still have success from time to time and I think with the team and the coaching staff we have now, we will continue to put a good account of ourselves going forward,” he said.

    “There will come a time when the frustration exceeds the benefit, possibly, not at that point yet, but you can never rule it out. We just hope people come to their senses that if we want the sustainability of this league for the long term, then we have to address these issues,” he added.

    Uytengsu isn’t also a fan of strong teams getting even stronger, raiding weaker teams by offering players more than what other mid-level teams could give.

    “We want to be remembered as a team which plays by the rules, a team that I think fans and other players also respect for how we play the game. Even our grand slam team is not, on paper, the greatest team. But I think we’re the team that played with the best team work,” he added.

    “So if I can use the analogy of the most recent NBA champions -- San Antonio Spurs -- I was rooting for the Spurs even though I have a lot of admiration for coach [Erik] Spoelstra, but I just don’t see the benefit or the value of loading your team with a bunch of superstars and going out and beating a team because every time you’ve got every thing to lose. It’s like shame on Miami for not having won. Whereas, you have an ageing team in San Antonio Spurs who came out and overachieved and a lot of people love to see that. Of course, you’ve got your fans in Miami, LeBron [James] and [Dwyane] Wade fans.”

    “For us, it’s the same way, we want to go down as an organization that is respected for having abided by the rules, showing great team work, made a good account of themselves every time they play, and it’s too early to say how we will be remembered because we want to be remembered at the championships yet to come. We’re not throwing in the towel. We expect us to be competitive in our next season. With Alex at the reins, we have high expectations that the team will be motivated. We have some veteran leadership on the team. We have some young blood as well. I think it’s a team that is hungry to win a championship. The road to 15 continues,” he added.


    By Sir Rey Joble
    http://www.bworldonline.com/conten...way,-says-alaska’s-wilfred-uytengsu&id=94573

    Note: with Permission of Sir Rey Joble
     
  2. Efil4zaggin

    Efil4zaggin All Star

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    RE: In sports or business, its about playing the right way, say Alaska’s Wilfred Uytengsu

    That is why I respect the Alaska organization. They are the only team that stand for what is right. Only Alaska and Rain or Shine stands in the way of the MVP and SMC teams, otherwise, it would always be a corporate slugfest every conference.

    In the 90's, I hated Alaska, they were so good that they could even beat any team using their 2nd stringers. They were never the star studded team in the likes of SMB, TNT, Ginebra that we see today, but they have the most consistent system, that is run by a complex coach, but was executed by the players that fit the system. Who are their stars back then on their grandslam years? You can only recall Johnny A, Jojo Lastimosa, and Bong Hawkins that are in an All Star level. Jeffrey Cariaso is more of a 6th man back then and not an All Star yet as he would eventually be. But aside from those players mentioned, no one is on any team's radar.

    I really hope the likes of GlobalPort, Kia, and Blackwater would eventually have a team that will compete too along with Alaska and Rain or Shine and give those MVP teams and SMC teams a run for their money. At least 5 of the 12 teams would be a challenge against the other 7 teams of SMC (Barako Bull included) and MVP teams. That would be more exciting.
     
  3. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    [​IMG]

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    Tune-Up game vs Korea

    94 Alaska Aces
    89 Korea

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  4. Nazareth

    Nazareth Starter

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    RE: In sports or business, its about playing the right way, say Alaska’s Wilfred Uytengsu

    That's the greatness of Alaska Organization, As a young Fan I see Alaska as one of the Teams that plays Fair and Square. The core value of the organization truly is instilled to the players and wishing to all the young fans like me.
     
  5. ThrashMetal

    ThrashMetal All Star

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    RE: In sports or business, its about playing the right way, say Alaska’s Wilfred Uytengsu

    hats off to you, Mr. Uytengsu..

    Sent from my mom's iPad using Tapatalk
     
  6. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    Bakit ni merge dito???? Sir Madam Mods paki explain? Nagtitipid ba sa Thread? Sana its seperate Thread, hindi naman sha update eh... Its an article. Tsk

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  7. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    Tune-up game vs Global Port tommorow is cancelled

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  8. Jetaw

    Jetaw Starter

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    may boxscore ba kayo nung tune up game against korea? gusto ko makita kung ilan pinuntos netong si banchero eh. haha!
     
  9. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    Sadly, wala eh. Pero sabi our new playera did well

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  10. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    [​IMG]

    From Alaska Aces official FB page... Today na yan....

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  11. arya25

    arya25 All Star

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    Tuneup final score:

    Kia 77 - Alaska 85
     
  12. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    [​IMG]
    ALASKA ACES BEAT KIA SORENTOS, 85-77

    The Alaska Aces got a big lift from Calvin Abueva, who scored seven of the team’s final eight points, to beat the Kia Sorentos in a practice game Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Gatorade Hoops Center.

    Abueva split his charities with 3:38 to go in the game to push Alaska to a nine point advantage, 78-69.

    The Sorentos countered with center Angelus Raymundo converting a layup and Paul Sanga draining a difficult triple to push Kia within four points of the Alaska lead, 78-74, with 2:16 left to play.

    Abueva then drove down the middle, steamrolling past his defender, to make an attempt from just underneath the goal with the ball hitting the front of the rim and bouncing inside. Hans Thiele countered with his own layup as the Aces held on to a four-point advantage, 80-76, with 1:49 to go in the game.

    At the Alaska offensive end Abueva was fouled and converted two free throws. He then scored from point blank range to push the outcome of the game beyond recall with the score at 84-76 with just 1:08 left to play.

    Alaska’s Jvee Casio and Kia’s LA Revilla converted a free throw each to finalize the count, 85-77.

    Alaska Aces center Sonny Thoss was unstoppable inside the paint from the very beginning. Thoss scored the first six points of Alaska, all on inside incursions. Thoss imposed his will early and could not be contained by the Kia Sorentos defenders.

    But it was a practice game after all and Alaska Aces head coach Alex Compton chose to give plenty of minutes to the other Alaska big men including Sam Eman, Eric Menk and Vic Manuel.

    The Aces gave the Sorentos the first taste of their formidable defense.

    Trailing 20-27 with 8:29 to go in the second period the Aces threw a full-court pressure defense on their surprised opponents. The Sorentos committed one turnover after another as Alaska outscored Kia, 17-5, to end the half leading 37-32.

    The Aces were tireless, relentless and unforgiving on defense, completing one steal after another.

    With 3:30 to go in the period Abueva picked off a long pass at the midcourt line with a two-handed grab and sprinted in for a layup. He was fouled and drained both free throws to cut the Kia lead to just one point, 29-30.

    Jvee Casio completed another steal with 3:20 to go in the quarter. He then dribbled into the paint and glided in for a layup to push Alaska ahead by a point, 31-30.

    Abueva completed another steal with 2:55 to go in the quarter. He then drove into the shaded lane and scored on another layup as Alaska led by three points, 33-30.

    The Kia Sorentos beat Barangay Ginebra, 73-71, and the Kuwait national team, 70-67, in their first two pre-season practice games. They dropped a slim 59-63 decision to Qatar a week ago.

    In their last game before the match against Alaska the Sorentos could not protect a 13-point third quarter advantage to lose to the Rain or Shine Elasto Painters, 87-92, in a closely fought game on Tuesday.


    Alaska Aces forward Calvin Abueva (8) drives strong to the hoop while trying to sidestep Kia Sorentos center Angelus Raymundo, who is about to foul him with a shoulder bump. The Aces got a big lift from Abueva to beat the Kia Sorentos in a practice game Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Gatorade Hoops Center.

    Alaska Aces veteran Dondon Hontiveros (25) charges past Kia Sorentos forward Eder Saldua . The Aces got a big lift from forward Calvin Abueva to beat the Kia Sorentos in a practice game Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Gatorade Hoops Center.

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    Source : alaskaaces.com.ph

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  13. ThrashMetal

    ThrashMetal All Star

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    Lakas talaga ni Abueva.

    Sent from my mom's iPad using Tapatalk
     
  14. arya25

    arya25 All Star

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    We are looking good at the tuneup results, I hope magtuloy tuloy na yan sa regular season. It seems the new setup plays are working great for the team. Good luck Aces!
     
  15. burn_1125

    burn_1125 Starter

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    Good signs ehehe seryoso na ang mga bata even during tune up games :7
     
  16. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    FIT AT 53 | Alaska’s Fred Uytengsu touts healthy lifestyle, talks Alaska’s youth advocacy
    Rey Joble, InterAksyon.com ·

    Monday, September 29, 2014 · 3:09 pm

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    Alaska’s Wilfred Uytengsu, at 53 years of age, is probably one of the fittest businessmen you will ever meet.

    An active competitor in the Ironman triathlon, the Alaska president and CEO is a true believer in the value of sports in business.

    It’s no surprise then that he leads by example for Alaska Milk in promoting an active, healthy lifestyle through its involvement in sports.

    “At 53, I believe in a healthy lifestyle, healthy body, clear mind, you’ll have a lot more energy and a lot more endurance in your business life. I’ve met a lot of 53-year-olds and they’re very fit. But to me, I like doing it because I enjoy it and if we will help others to adopt a healthy lifestyle then, well and good,” Uytengsu told InterAksyon.com in an exclusive interview.

    Uytengsu has always been involved in sports, dating back to his days as a varsity swimmer for the University of Southern California in Los Angeles in the 1980s. He served as captain of his school’s team while also representing the Philippines.

    He would later became the head of the Philippine Amateur Swimming Association as well as a big supporter of his alma mater’s swimming program, donating as much as $8-million to the USC Aquatics department.

    Uytengsu himself has returned to his roots as an athlete, with his attention this time turned to the Ironman event, a race that he originally brought to the country in 2009.

    He is also the owner of the Alaska Aces franchise in the PBA, one of the longest standing professional clubs in the league. The Aces have won 14 championships since its inception in 1986 and remains one of the few independent franchises remaining in Asia’s pioneering pro basketball league.

    Alaska has even expanded its basketball interests to the youth, through the Alaska Basketball Camp that goes around different parts of the country while also tying up with the NBA through the Jr. NBA and Jr. WNBA programs.

    Now Uytengsu and Alaska are looking to renew their commitment to the next generation, with events specifically targeted to encourage the youth to participate in sports – the 19th Alaska Cup, the largest football tournament in the country, and the Alaska Iron Kids.

    “In the case of football, we came to it a little bit by accident. My son was actually playing in a football tournament at the Ateneo. I met the organizer and we talked about the challenges that he had in trying to improve the program and make the program bigger,” said Uytengsu.

    “We sat down and we talked to him and we said, from Alaska’s standpoint, we’re already known in basketball, our basketball camps, we even expanded to the Jr. PBA, our partnership with the Jr NBA and Jr WNBA. But then we looked at football being actually a youth sport. We could help with the children because a lot of people play basketball, but not everyone.”

    “Soccer is another mass participation event. It still has a team dynamic and if we look at what are the values we want to inculcate in the youth – its hard work, teamwork, discipline, dedication, we can help from all those values thru sports to the youth in basketball and football,” he added.

    The Iron Kids, meanwhile, is a youth edition of the Ironman triathlon, and will encourage children to take up the sport.

    “We take that a step further. We look at ‘What is triathlon?’ Triathlon is the fastest growing sport in the world. It has really taken the Philippines by storm. Our Alaska Iron Kids program really was born out of aspiration of the children of the Ironman athletes. They also wanted to do what their parents did. So we shortened the distance quite a bit and we also made a focus of this participation,” said Uytengsu.

    For Uytengsu, maintaining a sports development program through kids is a must not just for them but for other private entities.

    “Sports is not about winning. It’s about going out and adopting a healthy lifestyle. Because the youth of today spends too much time on computers, on Facebook, on PlayStation and what’s happening is that they’re not learning how to sweat. They don’t know that it’s great to go outdoors and play and exercise. We’re trying to create an environment for them and adopt a healthy lifestyle,” added Uytengsu.

    “The implications of that generally, your health issues might manifest in your 40s. That is if you’re an active child. But today, if the children are not active, as early as elementary school or middle school, teenagers and the like, I think the real risk is that our children potentially will have health issues in their 30s because they didn’t have the cardio benefits of being a child. Your whole life was spent in the computer. Don’t spend your childhood there.”

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  17. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    Tune-up game vs NLEX @Hoops Mandaluyong

    12:30 PM

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  18. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    [​IMG]

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  19. khyndr3d

    khyndr3d All Star

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    [​IMG]

    "Have you ever dance with the devil in pale moon light?"
     
  20. arya25

    arya25 All Star

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    Nice 3-0 on tuneups for the Aces! Not bad. :C
     


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